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    Cheney Dentist Dispels Myths about Early Orthodontics

    Many parents are under the mistaken impression that their child has to be an adolescent, presenting severe alignment issues, in order to be considered for orthodontic treatment. This is not the case at all, and I’d like to take some time to give you the straight facts about the benefits of early orthodontic treatment for your child.

    Myth: My dentist won’t suggest orthodontics until my child has all their permanent teeth.

    This is not true with a dentist highly trained in early orthodontics - also known as preventative or phase one orthodontic treatment. At Cheney Dentist Office we know that the ages between 5 and 12 are the optimum years for your child to be seen in our office to address the possible need for early orthodontics. In this age range we can start to monitor the growth of their jaw and the resulting alignment of their teeth. It further enables us to develop an individualized treatment plan for your child.

    Myth: Even if potential problems are caught early, my child will still need braces.

    Again, this is not true for many young orthodontic patients. By monitoring the child’s development beginning at an early age it is often possible to eliminate the need for more extensive orthodontic treatment, through the use of orthodontic appliances and other methods in order to promote proper tooth alignment. A child may still require braces, but the treatment time is normally shortened because of early orthodontic treatment.

    How do I know if my child is a candidate for early orthodontics?

    Generally speaking, your child may be a candidate if you notice any of the following:

    • Crowded or misaligned teeth
    • Overbite or under bite
    • Thumb-sucking habit
    • Cleft palate

    However, as with most any dental treatment option, a dentist specializing in early orthodontic treatment like Cheney Early Orthodontics are the most qualified to advise the proper treatment plan for your child.